Passenger Systems

Modern passengers have ever higher demands as to the way they are being informed. Strukton Systems' dynamic passenger information and entertainment systems ensure that passengers get up-to-date information.

Up-to-date information

Strukton Systems passenger information and entertainment systems make it possible to provide up-to-date information to the passenger: Information about position, arrival and departure times and platform allocation for trains, buses, metro or trams. Both in the vehicle and on platforms or stations. Using real-time position-finding, the system knows exactly where vehicles are located at any time. Deviations from the timetable are therefore spotted and passengers are directly notified on the platform and in the train, tram or bus.

Internet and entertainment systems

In addition to passenger information, Strukton Systems make internet and entertainment accessible on the train, bus, metro or tram. Other options are automatic platform or stand allocation, an analysis of transport performance and the monitoring of vehicle position.

Variety of information

Passengers, drivers, traffic controllers and transport operators need different kinds of information. Our systems offer specific options for each category of users. Examples are displays at platforms and junctions, or information at home through the Internet. It is also possible to exchange information using the local travel information lines or providing web-based information to controllers and transport operators. 

Flexibility

Our systems have a modular design. Functionalities can therefore be easily expanded or added. The systems are supplier-independent and use the common information standards and open architecture. This makes the system flexible and enables us to supply our individual customers with systems that have been specifically optimised for them.

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Blog: Lean and swift dynamic passenger information systems

Peter Hoekstra_klein

Within my field, I generally prefer simple solutions. The simpler the architecture, the smaller the likelihood of errors. This rule also applies to the design of a central dynamic route information system (DRIS), for example.

Peter Hoekstra, Systems architect Strukton Systems

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